We’re closed…

June 3, 2015: My mission for this magazine was to empower authors, especially novelists, to create successful and sustainable careers through our articles from experts who’ve been there done that. We did that. You can still access all of our archives and past articles here. And for me to continue on my path for my own success and sustainability for my career, both as a coach and a novelist, I needed to consolidate my efforts. Going forward, I’ll be posting more interviews with author entrepreneurs over at my main blog, Writer’s Fun Zone. I wish you all the best in your author career!

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All my best, Beth Beth Barany Award-winning novelist & Creativity Coach for Writers


On Book Production

We do still help authors — both fiction and nonfiction — produce their books, or we can just design your cover. Go here for more information on that.


On Book and Writing Coaching

I continue to coach authors, specifically genre novelists. You can check out my services and products here.

  • And courses for fiction writers here.
  • And a 12-month program for novelists here.
Posted in News

Featured Q&A With Vince Stead

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Vince Stead

Please welcome, Vince Stead, to our weekly Featured Q&A at Author Entrepreneurship Magazine.

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Our main focus at Author Entrepreneurship Magazine is to help creative writers with their author marketing and book marketing efforts. Let’s discuss the connections between creativity and business, what’s sustainable for our creative soul, how to make marketing fun, useful, and easy. Thanks for joining the conversation!

***

About Vince Stead

Vince’s father owned a string of bakeries, but there was never really any money, his father drank and spent it away most of the time. At a very early age, Vince would go with his father every day to work, where is father and helpers would make all the bakery products at one bakery, and deliver them to the other bakeries every morning, and Vince would ride in the delivery van with his father every day until he was old enough to go to school.

Vince learned at an early age, that is father required him to pay for his stuff, like new school clothing and other stuff. Through out Vince’s whole childhood life, he worked weekends with his father in the middle of the night at his bakery, to earn money to buy clothes for school.

On to our interview!

1. Tell us who you are and how you help authors in 100 words or less.

My name is Vince Stead, and I have published many different books on Amazon and more.  I have helped many different authors put they words into print, digital and audio too.

2. How did you get to this place in your life? Share your story!

I got to this place in my life when I wrote my first book about 10 or so years ago, then I did four self published books where I paid a company to do them for me, then after that, I learned how to do them myself and save all that extra money I spent before.

3. What got you into this work. Tell us the story.

I was at my store, and I was arguing with my wife over something, and then I just said I’m going to be writing stories on the computer while working at my store, and I would get up early before the store opened, and I would jump out of bed ready to write, I was excited to write, I could not wait to get back to writing.

4. What are you most passionate about?

I’m most passionate about visiting family and taken vacations when I can.

5. Can you tell us a little bit about your writing process, routine, and/or rituals around your writing?

I have a routine where someone will send me the book they wrote, according to the plot they were given to write about, then I read it, then forward it for formatting for all the different platforms out their, each site like Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Lulu, etc, have their own guidelines you have to follow.

6. What are a few challenges you faced in creating, marketing, or publishing your creative work? And your solutions to them.

Of course the hardest thing in the book business is selling the darn things over and over again … try to write green stuff, stuff that would be relevant 20 years from now, not just a fad item. Some of my more challenging things were getting books made in audio. I have many many books in audio, with the help of about 50 different narrators.

7. What do you wish you had known before you started writing, and before you started your business helping authors?

I wish I would of known how to do it all myself. You can save a lot of money if you can do it all yourself.

8. What’s next for you in your creative work and your biz?

The last book I wrote, took me 3 hours to write, and it was a little over 5,000 words, just short enough that it could still be made into a paperback book, also digital and audio.  The audios sell way better than I ever thought they would.

9. If you haven’t already above, please share about your creative work/your books/products.

With the help of many different authors, formatters, and more, I am able to publish over 500 titles on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Lulu, Kobo, Createspace, ACX, Audible, Smashwords, Itunes, Google Books, Fun2ReadBooks and more.


Giveaway

Vince is giving away a copy of his book, Navy Fun, When Ronald Reagan was in Charge and Being in the Navy was a Blast

To enter, post a question for Vince below. He’ll answer and pick a winner at random in one week.

Navy Fun by Vince Stead

Navy Fun, When Ronald Reagan was in Charge and Being in the Navy was a Blast

See what it’s like to be out to sea on a ship, working and playing, in the middle of the ocean!

See all the Crazy and Wacky things Officer’s do, and see how the Admiral lives on an Aircraft Carrier!

Then, transfer to shore duty, where it seems the women are in charge, and there are plenty of them!


To connect with Vince, check out his Author Links:

Site Link: http://www.fun2readbooks.com

Twitter: @vincestead

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vince.stead.1?fref=ts

Navy Fun by Vince Stead

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Play Big as An Author Entrepreneur, Interview with Alicia Dunams (From the Archives of #AEMAG)

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Welcome to our weekly From the Archives at the Author Entrepreneurship Magazine. This week we feature Alicia Dunams from Issue 11: Fall 2013: Leadership & Mentorship. Her article is “Play Big as An Author Entrepreneur.”

This is timely as the summer writer conference season is upon us!

Enjoy and let us know your thoughts below. Thanks!


alicia-dunamsRecently I’ve launched an exciting joint project with author and entrepreneur, Alicia Dunams. Alicia is the founder of Bestseller in a Weekend, and I’m now teaching Bestseller in a Weekend for Fiction Writers, next intensive December 6-8, 2013.

Alicia Dunams motivates thousands of entrepreneurs around the world to play big to produce the business results and life they want. She’s coached hundreds of entrepreneurs worldwide to write, publish and market their book during her acclaimed live Bestseller in a Weekend program, toted “Best Online Program Ever” by event participants. With her online course 60 Days to 6-Figures, Alicia guides her clients through the strategies of launching and managing a profitable online business that makes money “while you sleep.”

Alicia was gracious enough to take time out of her busy schedule to answer some questions for the Author Entrepreneurship community.

Thanks!

1. What is your #1 tip on being an author entrepreneur? #2 tip? #3 tip?

My #1 tip for author entrepreneurs is build their online platform. There are two ways to do that. First, you can build your email list before you launch your book by providing incentives for people to sign up, such as special reports, e-books, videos or contests. These campaigns will catch on like wild fire if you have a 48 hour and up to a week deadline. (The human brain bypasses fear when there is a feeling of urgency. Otherwise, we tend to wait or procrastinate when there is nothing at stake.)

The second way is to write a book, upload to Amazon, and use Amazon as a lead generator to build your online platform. Our biggest feat as an author entrepreneur is to get people off of Amazon.com to our website to purchase our products and services.

Tip #2, for non-fiction authors, it’s important that you create a book title and subtitle that is keyword specific so that you can be found on the search engines, including Amazon.com, which is the #1 retailer search engine.

Tip #3, the serialization of books. It’s better to have four 100-page books on a niche subject or fiction work, rather than having one 400-page book.

For the non-fiction author, this ensures that your book is super niched and targeted on a particular audience and problem. For the fiction author, it gets people excited about the next phase of your novel.

2. How can one become a leader as an author entrepreneur?

You become a leader when you consider yourself a leader. Leaders enroll people into their vision of the world. Authors as leaders, enroll people into their vision of a particular book topic or thought movement. (Click to share on Twitter.) I have many clients that come to my Bestseller in a Weekend program to write a book to build their business and credibility, but often times the very action of writing a book gives them the confidence and expertise to launch a thought or service movement. Some of my clients have gone on to be leaders in particular movements around sex trafficking, ending lyme disease, helping small business, and supporting women with breast cancer.

3. Who has had the biggest influence on your success as an author entrepreneur?

If you want to grow your business and sell more books it’s important to aspire to be like others who have done the same. As the saying goes, Success leaves clues. I have had many mentors from Victor Cheng, Lewis Howes, Sanyika Calloway Boyce, and Loral Langemeier, New York Times bestseller author.

I have several mentors, one being Lewis Howes, author of LinkedWorking.

4. Who is your mentor currently, if you have one?

I also work closely with Loral Langemeier, New York Times bestselling author of the Millionaire Maker series and Yes Energy.

5. How do you define success as an author entrepreneur?

I would define success as changing people’s lives with your books, content, online trainings, and signature talks. How are you serving humanity by getting your content out into the world? How are you engaging your reader? How are you connecting on a deeper level?

Book sales and platform of course are empirical examples of your success, but for me it comes down to the lives you touch.

6. What has been your biggest hurdle in your journey as an author entrepreneur? How did you overcome it?

My biggest hurdle has been my ego. Isn’t that everyone’s hurdle? Once I decided to serve people instead of myself my life and business changed.

7. What is the big message you want everyone to know?

As an author and entrepreneur, I invite you to play big. First of all, finish your book. If your book is sitting as a MS-Word document on your computer, it’s not doing you a service or your clients or readers a service. Then use your book to position yourself as a leader and impact the world in a big way.

Thank you, Alicia! You inspire me to play big!


Become a Bestselling Author in 3 Days or Less with Alicia Dunams

Posted in From the Archives Tagged with: , , , , , ,

Featured Q&A With Carolyn Howard-Johnson

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Carolyn Howard-Johnson

Please welcome Frugal Editor, Carolyn Howard-Johnson, to our weekly Featured Q&A at Author Entrepreneurship Magazine. If you’d like to be considered for an interview, check out our guidelines here.

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Our main focus at Author Entrepreneurship Magazine is to help creative writers with their author marketing and book marketing efforts. Let’s discuss the connections between creativity and business, what’s sustainable for our creative soul, how to make marketing fun, useful, and easy. Thanks for joining the conversation!

Be sure to subscribe to our magazine. We published most days Monday through Friday.

***

About Frugal Editor, Carolyn Howard-Johnson

Carolyn Howard-Johnson’s brings her experience as a publicist, journalist, marketer, and retailer to the advice she gives in her HowToDoItFrugally series of books for writers and the classes she has taught for UCLA Extension’s world-renown Writers’ Program.

The first edition of The Frugal Book Promoter was named USA Book News’ “Best Professional Book” and won the coveted Irwin Award. Now in its second edition, it’s also a USA Book News award winner and received a nod from Dan Poynter’s Global Ebook Awards. Her The Frugal Editor: Put Your Best Book Forward to Avoid Humiliation and Ensure Success was also honored by USA Book News and won Readers’ Views Literary Award. Her marketing campaign for that book won the marketing award from New Generation Indie Book Awards. The second edition e-book was honored by Next Generation Indie Awards in the e-book category.

On to our interview!

1. Tell us who you are and how you help authors in 100 words or less.

I am a poet and fiction writer with tons of experience as a publicist, marketer, retailer and journalist who loves to help other authors with whatever is needed to make their books into publishing success stories.

2. How did you get to this place in your life? Share your story!

From first being chosen from my high school’s journalism staff to now?  My goodness! That’s a really long story! I will tell you that I was most excited about that because all the smartest, cutest boys in class were on that newspaper staff. Luckily, my love for writing stuck.

3. What got you into this work. Tell us the story.

I’ll tell you my philosophy instead. I think it’s wonderful to have goals, but not if it keeps a person from recognizing opportunity when it comes a long and sits in one’s lap.  It’s important to appreciate what the universe has in store for us instead of trying to constantly be in the director’s chair.

4. What are you most passionate about?

I am most passionate about writing, the use of words. But what we do with those words is even more important.  How we help others. The themes we choose to write about.

5. Can you tell us a little bit about your writing process, routine, and/or rituals around your writing?

I’m a poor one to give this advice. I’m intense about writing, but haven’t discovered the magic bullet yet other than just keeping at it. Perseverance is everything.

6. What are a few challenges you faced in creating, marketing, or publishing your creative work? And your solutions to them.

Two things stand out to me. The first is that we need to draw on our own experiences and apply them to the new twists that occur in our lives and careers. The second is that we can’t sit on our laurels (or our butts).  We have to keep learning. Conferences. Classes. Reading. I have a saying that “Reading one book on book marketing is never enough.”  I could amend that to encompass any subject. Most books–however comprehensive or well researched–is still told through one person’s lens.  We want a variety of ideas and approaches to solving problems and moving our careers ahead.

7. What do you wish you had known before you started writing, and before you started your business helping authors?

I wish I had known how much the publishing world had changed and how much it was going to change from that moment forward.

8. What’s next for you in your creative work and your biz?

I am writing two new books in the HowToDoItFrugally sereies for writers. One in conjunction with the smartest cover designed of all time, Chaz Desimone, on covers…what else.  And one on what no one ever tells authors about reviews and how to get great ones.

9. Is there anything else you wished I’d asked? Please share!

Aren’t you going to ask me about the most important promotional tool of all time?  Here it is. The old fashioned newsletter. They build loyalty.  And when used right, the build a network for you like none other.

10. If you haven’t already above, please share about your creative work/your books/products.

I have lots of books. A word count just won’t cute it.  Please visit my Web site at http://howtodoitfrugally.com and see that all my books are listed on the home page along with lots of the things I do there for other authors–many of them free.  Want to do another interview on those freebies? (-:


Giveaway

Carolyn is giving away a copy of her book, The Ultimate Frugal Booklet for Avoiding Word Trippers and Crafting Gatekeeper-Perfect Copy

To enter, post a question for Carolyn below. She’ll answer and pick a winner at random in one week.

Carolyn Howard-Johnson Great Little Last-Minute Editing Tips for Writers:
The Ultimate Frugal Booklet for Avoiding Word Trippers and Crafting Gatekeeper-Perfect Copy
From the HowToDoItFrugally Series of books for writers
EAN-13: 9781450507653
Kindle Edition: EAN: B0042JT1UA
To order paperback or e-book: http://bit.ly/Last-MinuteEditing

June Casagrande, author of Grammar Snobs Are Great Big Meanies (Penguin) and syndicated grammar columnist guru, says, “By creating a guide designed specifically to get writers past gatekeepers, Carolyn Howard-Johnson has created something of unmatched value: usage advice that cuts through the contentious world of grammar to offer real help. Writers polishing their manuscripts and query letters will find Howard-Johnson’s guide more useful than Strunk and White.”

This little booklet is carry-with-you protection against grammar gremlins and the frugal price of $6.95 includes a free e-book using Kindle’s Matchbook program.


To connect with Carolyn, check out her Author Links:

Site Link: http://howtodoitfrugally.com

Twitter @frugalbookpromo

Facebook: http://facebook.com/carolynhowardjohnson

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/carolynhowardjohnson

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/chowardjohnson/

The Frugal Book Promoter by Carolyn Howard-Johnson

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Tips on Negotiations from a Literary Agent: Interview with Arielle Eckstut By Beth Barany (From the Archives of #AEMAG)

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Welcome to our weekly “From the Archives” at the Author Entrepreneurship Magazine. This week we feature Beth Barany from Issue 10: Summer 2013-Negotiations. Her article is “Tips on Negotiations from a Literary Agent: Interview with Arielle Eckstut.”

This is timely as the summer writer conference season is upon us!

Enjoy and let us know your thoughts below. Thanks!


I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Arielle Eckstut, agent-at-large at the Levine Greenberg Literary Agency, one of New York City’s most respected and successful agencies. For over 20 years, she has been helping hundreds of talented writers become published authors. Arielle is not only the author of nine books, but she is also a successful entrepreneur. She co-founded the iconic company, LittleMissMatched, and grew it from a tiny operation into a leading national brand, which now has stores from everywhere from Disneyland to Disney World to Fifth Avenue in New York City. Together with her husband, David Henry Sterry, they run the successful consulting firm, The Book Doctors www.thebookdoctors.com, and run the very popular event, Pitchapalooza, across the country. They are also the authors of The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published: How to Write It, Sell It, and Market It . . . Successfully.

Beth:    Hi Arielle, Thanks for agreeing to the interview! Tell us what tips or advice you have for someone who doesn’t know about negotiations, but since they’re an author, they need to be knowledgeable about contracts and negotiations.

Tip #1: On Who Speaks First

Arielle: Sure! My very first piece of advice when negotiating anything is to always let the other party offer up the first piece of the negotiation, whether it’s an advance or the royalty structure. Whatever it is, to let them have the first word.

I have a great story about this that really drives home why this is important. My former boss created a really cool software product with two friends. They took their idea to what later turned into Microsoft.

They had decided beforehand that they were not going to accept anything less than $30,000. They said no matter what, it has to be $30,000 or more. So they go into the room with the people who were going to buy it, and before any of them had a chance to say their big plans for their 30k, the head of the company said to them, “Listen, we can’t offer you more than one million dollars for this.” So, if one of them had spoken up with what they thought was their big number, they would have walked out on $970,000.

You just never know what someone is going to offer. If they lowball you, you can always say, “That’s just unacceptable.” But if you go first and they have a higher idea, you’ll never get to the place where they were because obviously they’ll just say, “Fine, you want $2 for your book, we’ll give you $2 (even though we had planned to offer you $100).”

Tip #2: On Royalties & Collaboration 

While this piece of advice completely depends on your personality, I always found that I got a lot more out of negotiations by being collaborative rather than adversarial. I always took the approach of how can we both benefit from this negotiation.

A good example of this is a lot of times publishers will say, “I’m going to give you X percentage of your paperback,” and it’s like 7 percent flat. But I’ve always said to people, “Look, that’s great, but what if the book does really well, and you’re rolling in the cash from it. Why shouldn’t the author benefit as well? At first, you’re still trying to make back what you’ve put in, but after that point why not go up to 7.5 and then up to 8, then 8.5 and then 9 percent? That way you’re covered for where you need to be, you’ve made an investment, which is wonderful, but then after that everyone shares in the riches.”

I found that I got a lot of mileage out of that kind of negotiation which acknowledges what the [publisher] is contributing, but then also says, “Let’s all have a win-win, if the win happens.”

Tip #3: Know The Alternatives 

The last thing is to really understand what you can live with and what you can’t. A lot of times when I was an agent representing authors I would ask my authors what’s the least amount of money you could do this book for. They would say, “I can’t do this book for less than $75,000.” And then the publisher would offer $50,000. I would say, “I’m sorry, that’s not going to do it.” And then we would lose the deal. And the author would say, “Oh no! I could’ve have done it for 50.” So it’s really important to understand what you can and can’t do.

Beth:    Thank you, Arielle!

Resources: For more information on setting up your negotiation alternatives, check out “Defining BATNA (Best Alternative to a Negotiated Agreement)http://negotiation.atwork-network.com/2008/07/18/defining-batna-best-alternative-to-a-negotiated-agreement/.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Beth Barany, Editor & Publisher of the Author Entrepreneur Magazine, Helping Authors Create Successful Careers

Beth Barany is the publisher of the Author Entrepreneurship Magazine. She coaches and advises authors on their career and helps authors write, publish and market their books. She’s an award-winning fantasy author and lives in Oakland, CA, with her husband, bestselling author, Ezra Barany, and their two cats, and hundreds of books. More about how Beth supports authors at www.BethBarany.com.


The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published by Arielle Eckstut and David Henry Sterry

Posted in From the Archives Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,

Featured Q&A With Carol Malone

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Author, Carol Malone

Author, Carol Malone

Please welcome Award-winning author Carol Malone, to our weekly Featured Q&A at Author Entrepreneurship Magazine. If you’d like to be considered for an interview, check out our guidelines here.

***

Our main focus at Author Entrepreneurship Magazine is to help creative writers with their author marketing and book marketing efforts. Let’s discuss the connections between creativity and business, what’s sustainable for our creative soul, and most pointedly, how to make marketing fun, useful, and easy. Thanks for joining the conversation!

Be sure to subscribe to our magazine. We published most days Monday through Friday.

***

About Award-winning author, Carol Malone

Award-winning author Carol Malone has successfully combined her three passions – romance, sports, and writing in her two highly-rated books, Fight Card Romance: Ladies Night, and its Christmas sequel. She was the first woman who took a dare to write a pulp-fiction’esk romance for the all-male dominated genre of Fight Card. Carol invites her readers to scramble into a front row seat for a power-packed thrill-ride of sports and romance. If not hammering out new tales, Carol’s loves reading, sports, and hanging with her author husband on the coast of California.

On to our interview!

1. Tell us who you are and how you help authors in 100 words or less.

After years of paying the price to learn my writer’s path, I want to be able share my hard-fought, accumulate writers knowledge with writers just beginning their journey. We’re all at different spots along that journey. I believe I have something others can glean from to hone their craft and manage their writer’s life. Everyone who has gone one before should reach back and offer a hand up to those just beginning the journey. That’s what I want to do.

2. How did you get to this place in your life? Share your story!

I’ve been a creative all my life. Making up stories to pass my extensive alone time as a child with not many close friends, I could spin a yarn so complicated, I captivated the interests of those people around me. Later, I started writing these stories down. Much, much later, I took college courses that inspired me, worked with fascinating people and personal and professional mentors who stretched me, made me reach beyond my knowledge. I’ve been writing professionally for 7 years and published for 2.

3. What got you into this work. Tell us the story.

I took a writing course in our local college. This man opened my eyes to the world of professional writing. We were allowed to write about anything or anybody and everything was acceptable. He never placed a limit on our creativity and I began to spread my wings and flap for the sky. I wrote 6 manuscripts from January to June that year. The floodgates were opened and there was no stopping what happened. I haven’t stop writing since that time. When a great mentor told me I was an author, that was the greatest moment of all. I’ve been guided, challenged, motivated, criticized, brought back to reality, taught the mechanics and rules, then told to disregard them, then I was told to let it all go, to write my heart out and leave it on the page. I started writing about one of my passions, romance. Along the path, I discovered another passion, suspense/mystery/crime and took a different fork. I discovered that holding myself back from experiencing all forms of creativity writing was a crime. So I write what I want and ideas come like water over the falls.

4. What are you most passionate about?

I have several passions: first and foremost is my family–extended and immediate. I love my husband of 33 years and my 32 year son. They are both IT guys and keep my computers shipshape. I love my 4 older brothers and their kids, grand-kids and great-grand-kids. We have reunions which I adore. Sometimes I’ll put them in my stories–although they don’t know that.

Another passion is romance: Although I don’t get a lot of mushy stuff at home, which is fine by me, I can find it in a book. So I started reading romance books in my teens. But it wasn’t until I started writing, that I really sunk my teeth into reading romance books. I read about 100+ every year–now it’s for research and to learn how they do that.

My other passion is sports: I was raised with four boys and was surrounded by sports of all kinds from a very young age. One of my best memories is a trip to Dodger stadium when I was young.

Of course, another passion is writing. I also like a good suspense/romance, so when I combine all my passions, I get gold.

5. Can you tell us a little bit about your writing process, routine, and/or rituals around your writing?

I have to have a comfortable chair, an adjustable foot rest, a box near by to rest my sciatic riddled leg and two computer screens. I’d have more, but they wouldn’t fit on my monitor stand. I like to have a deadline. I work best under pressure. Go figure since I hate pressure in my normal life. But my creative life thrives on pressure. I need goals (not something I could say until I started writing). I love NaNoWriMo because there’s a goal AND a deadline. I have have won the last three with manuscripts I adore.

I like to create a character chart before I begin or write the first page or two with an inciting moment in the life of my characters. I’m still learning how to give my characters their own goals and motivation, but I’m getting there. I’m a pantzer–writing by the seat of my pants, but I do like to have a general idea of situations that could possible pop up to thwart my h/h’s (hero/heroine) progress. Sometimes I like music, sometimes not. I like to look out my window and feel the breeze. I tried to keep out distractions and fight procrastination.

6. What are a few challenges you faced in creating, marketing, or publishing your creative work? And your solutions to them.

I didn’t have much of a challenge writing my book. It seemed to flow. I had lots of mentors to help that process.

Lack of knowledge regarding marketing was a downer. Also a rush to self-publish before I knew what I was doing. Not doing pre-sale stuff like blog announcements, pre-sales on Amazon. From what I know now, I’ll be able to put the procedures in place BEFORE launching my book. Launch FB parties, blog hops, blog announcements, press releases, FB group saturation, etc. That’s what writing education is for, right? To be prepared and ready. There are so many FREE things to do to get prepared. I’m looking forward to dropping the next story so I can employee these new ideas.

7. What do you wish you had known before you started writing, and before you started your business helping authors?

I’m not sure I would have wished for anything before I started, because I basically started at the beginning writing small simple pieces and then moving on to bigger and better stuff. I suppose it would have been nice to have taken a course or two in the “Rules of Writing” set forth my Elmore Leonard–the do’s and don’ts, but I got them eventually. I do wish I’d started seriously writing at a much younger age. It feels like I have to write with an urgency now before my time runs out. Of course, there are people who have started writing later in life than me, but I can’t stop feeling I have limited time.

8. What’s next for you in your creative work and your biz?

I would like to follow in the footsteps of my creativity, muse, and book coach, Beth Barany. I’m learning so much from her already and have done an editing job at her suggestion which tested my editing skills and my writing knowledge. I find imparting what I’ve learned gives me a wealth of joy and actually helps stimulate me to learning more myself.

Teaching and encouraging writing skills and writers isn’t always a pleasure especially when they client/student doesn’t apply you’re wisdom, but that’s okay, too. They have every right to incorporate what they want and leave the rest behind. Learning to be humble as I share is an ongoing skill set I’m trying to perfect.

9. Is there anything else you wished I’d asked? Please share!

I would have asked why promoting and marketing books is so difficult and why there isn’t one special handbook or expert instead of zillions. Who do you turn to where there are so many experts in the field? Whose voice is the one that will resonate with you and how will I know it? How can I fight the need to seek just one more opinion, one more guru, one more webinar even though it takes time from my writing and confuses me, or costs $$$ for which I have no resources? Is paying the price destined to be outrageously expensive?

10. If you haven’t already above, please share about your creative work/your books/products.

Like I mentioned, I started writing contemporary romance, was told by an editor of St. Martin’s Press that it sucked, but as long as I was willing to shell out $50 per week, she’d keep pointing out my errors. I learned that mentoring doesn’t have to be expensive or brutal on my psyche. I found someone who was gentle, caring, and interested in my success, not just chasing after my pocketbook. I found a local hero willing to give me a challenge to write in an entirely different genre and thus gave me my first two published books. I was willing to step into volunteer positions at my local writers group and have gain experience and knowledge that is priceless. My characters are my babies and I grieve after I finish a book because I won’t be working or living closely with them again. I call it PTNSD–Post Traumatic Novel Stress Disorder (not to slight or make fun of the real affliction.)


Giveaway

Carol is giving away a copy of her book, Fight Card Romance: Ladies Night.

To enter, post a question for Carol below. She’ll answer and pick a winner at random in one week.

Fight Card Ladies Night by Carol Malone

Fight Card Romance: Ladies Night

L.A. 1954, Gangsters, Crime, boxing and romance … Boxing hopeful, Jimmy Doherty’s in the fight of his life to save his gal, Lindy from a murder rap before both of them wind up on a slab.


To connect with Carol, check out her Author Links:

Site Link: http://carolmalone.net/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CarolAnneMalone

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/carolmaloneauthor

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/carolmalone/

Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/carolannemalone/

Fight Card

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VIDEO for Writers: “The The Impotence of Proofreading” by TAYLOR MALI

SS for ae funny

Welcome back to Tuesday Funnies for Writers, where I post funny, insightful or useful videos and comics for authors.

This week’s video was suggested by author, Alica Mckenna Johnson. Thank you! I LURVED it!

‪”The The Impotence of Proofreading” by TAYLOR MALI‬

What are your thoughts, opinions (not onions!) about proofreading? What tips do you have for other writers?

Thanks!


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How Conferences and Workshops Can Benefit Writers of Any Level by Vanessa Kier (From the Archives of #AEMAG)

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Welcome to our weekly From the Archives at the Author Entrepreneurship Magazine. This week we feature Vanessa Kier from Issue #8 on Feb. 2013: Conferences And Workshops. Her article is “How Conferences and Workshops Can Benefit Writers of Any Level.”

This is timely as the summer writer conference season is upon us!

Enjoy and let us know your thoughts below. Thanks!


Eat, sleep, readWriting conferences and workshops provide invaluable information and offer networking opportunities that benefit writers at any stage of their writing journey. 

The trick is to understand your current writing goals before you attend and pick the conference or workshop most likely to give you the knowledge you’re missing. Even shy writers, or writers on a limited budget, can benefit from these opportunities.

New Writer

My primary goal as a new writer was to learn how to write a compelling story. So I attended as many craft workshops as possible on topics such as goal, motivation and conflict, plotting, character development, dialogue, and setting. I picked workshops based on the issues I struggled with in my manuscript at the time, or issues that I knew were a continuous problem for me.

Intermediate

As I became more adept at putting together a compelling story, my needs changed. I wanted more advanced classes on craft, such as how to draw readers in by writing in deep POV. I also started my hunt for an agent and attended every possible agent or editor talk. Many conferences offer the opportunity to pitch your manuscript to an agent and/or and editor, and I took advantage of these as well. Other helpful workshops covered topics such as writing synopses and cover letters that get you out of the slush pile, and how to start building your author brand.

Advanced

Once I signed with an agent and had my manuscripts out on submission, I found myself more interested in the business and research aspects of writing. I learned about tax and legal issues. I took workshops on self-publishing and forensics.

Published

Can a workshop or conference offer anything to a published author? Many published authors I know are too busy with business meetings during a conference to take advantage of the workshops. However, teaching a workshop, whether at a local or national event, is a positive way to get your name before potential fans and supporters. I say supporters, because having other writers spread the word about your books can be even more valuable than the money gained if they purchase your books. 

Writers of All Levels

The wonderful thing about attending a conference is the variety of workshops that appeal to writers of any level. For example: Workshops on marketing, including the effective use of social media, and workshops where the publication process is explained from the moment an editor first looks at your manuscript to the day the book hits the store.

I love to attend talks given by highly successful writers. I always come away with some new insight into the writing life or writing business, and often find myself reenergized in my fight to overcome my personal writing stumbling blocks.

Conferences vs Workshops

Which is right for you? A conference or a workshop?

A workshop is the same as a class. A typical in-person workshop lasts 1-2 hours. An online workshop might last for one day up to one month.

A conference usually spans at least one day, with multiple workshops being presented, sometimes concurrently. There will likely be a mix of educational, motivational, and social events. A conference might be national, with people from all over the country attending, or local.

BinderSmaller, local events might be more comfortable for shy writers. Shy writers should also check to see if the conference offers a first-timer orientation session.

Local conferences are also more affordable for writers on a budget, since travel and hotel costs are minimal.

You don’t need to attend a conference to take a workshop. Check the calendar of your local writing group to see if they host one-day intensive workshops. I’ve attended local one-day workshops on marketing and branding, plotting, and on a variety of research topics.

Not comfortable leaving your home just yet? Can’t afford to travel? Check out one of the many sites that offer inexpensive online workshops, such as SavvyAuthors.com or WritersOnlineClasses.com. These workshops are often taught via Yahoo! Groups or another online provider that allows students to receive the lessons as emails. You can also see the replies of the other students and respond with your own comments. These opportunities are good for shy or busy writers, since you can participate as much or as little as you are comfortable with. Because you get the lessons via email, the information is still accessible after the class has ended.

So, there you have it! No matter whether you’re shy or an extrovert, a beginner or published writer, conferences and workshop have something to offer you. I hope to see you at a workshop some day!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Vanessa KierVanessa Kier is an occasional workshop presenter. She plans to attend at least one national writing conference this year. WAR: Disruption, the latest book of her new romantic thriller trilogy, is available now at most e-retailers. Visit her at www.vanessakier.com. ©2013-2015 All rights reserved.


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Featured Resource: The Story Grid by Shawn Coyne

How to #AEMAG Resource-storygrid

How to #AEMAG Resource-storygridRESOURCE for FICTION WRITERS + NARRATIVE NONFICTION WRITERS

The Story Grid by Shawn Coyne
http://www.storygrid.com/

WHO: I’m Beth Barany, award-winning novelist and Creativity Coach for Writers. http://www.BethBarany.com

WHY: I post these videos: I walk my talk, and with pleasure.

ABOUT: Today I share a resource I’m really loving: The Story Grid by Shawn Coyne, http://www.storygrid.com/.

If you’re a beginner or advanced fiction writer, haven’t written a word or have finished your manuscript, this book can be useful to you.

I highly recommend this book.

You’re also welcome to schedule a Discovery Session with me, Beth Barany: http://bethbarany.com/services.html.

Best,
Beth

Editor & Publisher of Author Entrepreneurship Magazine

Creativity Coach for Writers


REMINDER: Weekly Giveaway

Brandi Megan Granett, this week’s Featured Q&A guest, is giving away a copy of her book, Cars and Other Things That Get Around.

To enter, post a question for Brandi here. She’ll answer and pick a winner at random in next Wednesday, May 20.

Cars and Other Things That Get Around by Brandi Megan GranettThe narrators from the short story collection, Cars and Other Things That Get Around, travel through life’s journey with one thing in mind: to connect. This most basic human need is reflected in the lives of a woman preparing for yet another blind date, a married couple awaiting a cancer diagnosis, and an Amish man struggles with the loss of his son.

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Tips on Negotiating at the Author Entrepreneurship Magazine

Author Entrepreneurship Magazine-Summer-2013

Author Entrepreneurship Magazine-Summer-2013Welcome to our Thursday “Featured Tip” at the Author Entrepreneurship Magazine. This week we feature “Tips on Negotiating” from the Summer 2013 issue of the Author Entrepreneurship Magazine.

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As the editor and publisher of this magazine, I struggled with how to frame the conversation around negotiations, the theme of this issue.

Negotiations are a dry topic, but the 5 articles by our authors and the 1 interview, with a literary agent, actually bring this very important topic to life. With humor and love!

In my experience as an author entrepreneur, learning how to negotiate is key. I discovered in some entrepreneur trainings I took a few years back how bad I was at negotiation, and how important this skill is to our success of our author careers.

We need to learn how to negotiate contracts, or work rates if you’re a coach or consultant, and even negotiate with family members to make sure you have time to write and market our books.

My Short Notes on Negotiating, before you start negotiating:

  1. Know what you want.
  2. Know how low and how high you’re willing to go (whether you’re discussing money, time, or other factors.)
  3. Get curious about what the other person wants.
  4. Take a deep breath and reach across the table with an open heart. Good luck! Let me know how your negotiations go!

Check out the list of articles below:

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